3D graphene

2017 edition

Arevik Musheghyan

Carbon nanostructures have received enormous attention recently to their excellent properties. For example graphene show excellent physical properties in intrinsic mobility, mechanical strength,optical transmittance and electrical conductivity. These properties make graphene a promising material in a wide range of applications of electronics,optoelectronics,sensors, batteries and supercapacitors. Recent years three-dimensional (3D) graphene attracts attention due to its high surface-area-to-volume ration. 3D graphene or so called graphene nanowalls are networks of graphitic sheets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate.

Recent years three-dimensional (3D) graphene attracts attention due to its high surface-area-to-volume ration. 3D graphene or so called graphene nanowalls are networks of graphitic sheets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate. In our laboratory we produce graphene nanowalls at low temperature (500-750Ôü░C) by Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (ICPCVD) method on polycrystalline Cu foils, c-Si wafers and amorphous silica substrates.┬á For each application, 3D graphene should be grown on suitable substrate. For example, GNWs grown on Cu foil becomes an excellent electrode for supercapacitors, meanwhile, GNWs on dielectric (SiO2) substrate could be used to fabricate gas or bio-sensors, also GNWs on semiconductor substrates could be used rather for potential application of solar cells. We have explored the growth parameters: plasma power, gas flow, temperature, pressure or cooling time, and how they affect the morphological and structural properties of the obtained graphene nanowalls. Despite that at present, there is no general agreement on anunified theory to unveil the GNW growing mechanism and to provide guidance for optimum growth condition using different plasma power and temperature, our process and particular technological parameters can suggest new evidences of the growth mechanisms. The present results of GNWs show new points of view of their morphology.